Why No Homework?

At The Country School we believe that happy kids make more eager learners. We believe in preserving the gift of childhood, and we promote the development of individuality and passionate pursuits. One of the ways we promote these values is through our No Homework Policy. See the resources below to learn more about how and why we do what we do.

Publications

TCS is featured in the National Association of Independent Schools Inspiration Lab - Read the Article Here

“The Results Are In: The Kids Are Thriving”– ERB scores go up, stress goes down, and families get more tome to spend together

“The Results Are In: The Kids Are Thriving”– ERB scores go up, stress goes down, and families get more tome to spend together

“It’s Time to Get Real About Homework” – Holly Novick’s article about our new policy in the TCS Newsletter

“It’s Time to Get Real About Homework” – Holly Novick’s article about our new policy in the TCS Newsletter

 
Ventura Boulevard Magazine, Oct. 2013 - Information and background about the implementation of the No Homework Policy

Ventura Boulevard Magazine, Oct. 2013 - Information and background about the implementation of the No Homework Policy

 

Research Resources

"Homework: New Research Suggests It May Be an Unnecessary Evil"Huffington Post

“Research Spotlight on Homework” - National Education Association

“Are You Down With or Done With Homework?” - Harvard Graduate School of Education

Video

Books

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The Homework Myth – Death and taxes come later; what seems inevitable for children is the idea that, after spending the day at school, they must then complete more academic assignments at home. The predictable results: stress and conflict, frustration and exhaustion. Parents respond by reassuring themselves that at least the benefits outweigh the costs.

But what if they don’t? In The Homework Myth, Alfie Kohn systematically examines the usual defenses of homework – that it promotes higher achievement, “reinforces” learning, teaches study skills and responsibility. None of these assumptions, he shows, actually passes the test of research, logic, or experience.

So why do we continue to administer this modern cod liver oil – or even demand a larger dose? Kohn’s incisive analysis reveals how a mistrust of children, a set of misconceptions about learning, and a misguided focus on competitiveness have all left our kids with less free time and our families with more conflict. Pointing to parents who have fought back – and schools that have proved educational excellence is possible without homework — Kohn shows how we can rethink what happens during and after school in order to rescue our families and our children’s love of learning.

The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is Hurting Children and What Parents Can Do About It - In The Case Against Homework, Bennett and Kalish draw on academic research, interviews with educators, parents, and kids, and their own experience as parents and successful homework reformers to offer detailed advice to frustrated parents. You’ll find out which assignments advance learning and which are time-wasters, how to set priorities when your child comes home with an overstuffed backpack, how to talk and write to teachers and school administrators in persuasive, nonconfrontational ways, and how to rally other parents to help restore balance in your children’s lives.